Teapot Mountain, British Columbia, Canada (9-5-16)

Day 38 of Lupe’s Summer of 2016 Dingo Vacation to the Canadian Rockies, Yukon & Alaska

Lupe’s morning started at 7:00 AM with a quick side trip into nearby Fort St. John for fuel for the G6.  Then it was back N a few miles to the turn SW onto Hwy 29 to Chetwynd.  Making that turn, Lupe left the Alaska Highway for the final time on her Summer of 2016 Dingo Vacation.

Hwy 29 was a beautiful drive.  For a while, the road followed a stretch of the Peace River valley.  However, that feeling of being in the truly far N, which Lupe had while in the Yukon and Alaska, was fading fast.  At Chetwynd, SPHP turned W on Hwy 97.  It would eventually turn S and take Lupe to Prince George.  This was still gorgeous, unspoiled territory, all wild, forested, and full of rivers and lakes, but Lupe saw no more snow-capped mountains, not even on the most distant horizon.

Nearly all day would be spent driving, but Lupe did have one adventure in store for her.  She was going to take the trail up Teapot Mountain, sometimes touted as one of the best day hikes of central interior British Columbia.  The trail isn’t long, only 0.9 mile (1.4 km).  It climbs an ancient steep-sided basaltic plug which survived the last ice age, while gaining 650 feet of elevation (200 meters).

The sky clouded up.  Light rain showers dampened the highway.  Miles rolled by.  Suddenly, ack!  Talus Road!  Wasn’t that it?  Yes, and SPHP had missed the turn.  Oh, well.  At least the sign had been spotted.  SPHP found a place to turn around.  A few minutes later, Lupe was turning W onto gravel Talus Road.

A kilometer later, SPHP missed the R turn onto Caine Creek Forestry Road, too.  The whole area seemed to be a maze of gravel roads, and the signage wasn’t great.  Nevertheless, after a brief exercise in futility, Lupe did make it back to Caine Creek Forestry Road, which wound around for 2 miles (3 km) before crossing a bridge over a creek connecting a couple of skinny, swampy lakes on either side.

As the road started curving L after crossing the bridge, a sign could be seen tucked back at the edge of the trees near a dirt side road on the R.  Nearby was enough parking space for several vehicles.  The sign said Teapot Mtn.  An arrow pointed into the forest along the side road.  Not another soul or vehicle was around, but this had to be the trailhead.

SPHP parked, and Lupe got out of the G6.  The sky was clearing a little again.  The sun was trying to break through.  On the way here, Lupe had seen densely forested Teapot Mountain a little to the W.  It didn’t look very big after all the mountains Lupe had seen on this Dingo Vacation.  The trip up Teapot Mountain (3,009 ft.) wouldn’t take long.

Lupe had plenty of time.  Why not take a look at the swampy lakes and the creek from the bridge, before going up the mountain?

Lupe at the trailhead. There was room to park maybe half a dozen vehicles nearby.
Lupe along Caines Creek Forestry Road near Teapot Mountain. Photo looks NNW at the larger of the two skinny, swampy lakes. The swampy lakes were actually part of the Crooked River, which flows N.

The water in the creek, which was actually the Crooked River, looked clean and clear.  From the smaller skinny lake, it flowed N under the bridge.  Both skinny lakes were part of the river system.  Lupe didn’t see any fish in the river, but no doubt there must be some.  The lakes had plenty of water and looked like great habitat.

In the 15 minutes Lupe spent sniffing around the Crooked River and the swampy lakes, 2 vehicles had arrived and parked at the Teapot Mountain trailhead.  Hikers were already somewhere on the trail ahead of her by the time Lupe started out.  The first part of the trail followed the side road, which curved NW as it led Lupe into the forest.  The side road dead-ended after only a few hundred feet.

Lupe on the short side road which served as the first part of the Teapot Mountain trail. The road curved NW as it led Lupe into the dense forest. Photo looks W.

Where the side road ended, a wide path strewn with leaves led off to the W toward Teapot Mountain.  Lupe hadn’t gained any elevation yet, but she was about to.  The path started climbing steadily, slowly at first, but it quickly became steep.

Lupe near the start of the path to Teapot Mountain after the side road dead-ended. The path started out level as shown here, but quickly became quite steep. Photo looks W.

The well worn trail was easy to follow, but soon became a real challenge for heart, lungs and legs.  It worked its way over to the SE face of Teapot Mountain, where it began to climb even more steeply heading almost straight up the mountain.

The dense, lush forest hid all views.  Many tree roots and rocks were exposed on the trail, which was hard packed.  This part of the Teapot Mountain trail must be very slick when wet, but it wasn’t bad as Lupe made her ascent.

Teapot Mountain hadn’t looked that big from below, but felt bigger with each step up.  The relentless steep rate of climb continued until Lupe reached a junction close to the top of the mountain.  Here, the trail divided.  Lupe could go L or R.  It didn’t really matter which way she went, since both directions were part of the circular loop trail around the upper rim of Teapot Mountain.  Lupe went R (N), hoping to catch a view of the Crooked River below.

Just because Lupe had reached the loop trail didn’t mean she could see anything.  The top of Teapot Mountain was as densely forested as all the rest of it was.  The trail had come up near the SE end of the mountain, at a part of the rim that proved to be a little lower than most of it.  The summit area contained within the loop trail was acres in size.  The interior terrain sloped gradually and unevenly up toward some unseen high point.

The loop trail was an easy, almost level stroll.  Lupe didn’t have to go very far N before she came to a break in the trees where she could see a long, skinny lake down along the Crooked River off to the NE.

Lupe could see one of the long, skinny lakes that was part of the Crooked River system from the loop trail. Photo looks NE.

On her way around the N rim of Teapot Mountain, Lupe came to no more viewpoints until she reached some cliffs at the NW end of the mountain.  Lupe could see a large shallow pond in a clearing far below.

From cliffs near the NW end of the loop trail, Lupe saw this shallow pond in a clearing below. Topo maps show that the top of Teapot Mountain is somewhat smaller than this pond. The loop trail around the perimeter really isn’t very long. Part of Jakes Lake, a much bigger body of water, is farther away on the L. Photo looks W.

From the cliffs at the NW viewpoint, Lupe didn’t have far to go to reach a big tan-colored rock formation at the SW end of the mountain.  Up until now, Lupe hadn’t seen anyone along the trail.  She found everyone here, congregated on the rock formation which offers the premier view from Teapot Mountain.

A friendly dog wanted to play with Lupe, but with cliffs so close by, the humans put a quick end to all the mad dashing and chasing around.  A wooden bench was nearby to the E.  Lupe got up on it for a look at the big view.  Summit Lake, which is quite large and has an interesting irregular shape, was the main attraction.  Lupe could see the N end of Summit Lake dotted with forested islands not too far away to the S.

From the SW viewpoint, Lupe could see Summit Lake dotted with forested islands. Photo looks S.
Summit Lake through the telephoto lens.

While everyone else remained congregated on the tan rock formation, Lupe and SPHP went off in search of the true summit of Teapot Mountain.  The highest point Lupe found was a nice mossy spot at the end of a very faint trail into the interior.  The summit wasn’t far from the SW viewpoint at all.

Lupe sits comfortably on the mossy spot at the true summit of Teapot Mountain. Photo looks N.

Lupe returned to the loop trail.  People were getting ready to depart.  Before long, Lupe had the premier viewpoint on Teapot Mountain all to herself.

Lupe conducts her initial investigation of the premier viewpoint on Teapot Mountain. She discovers a sign indicating she is 1 km from the trailhead (by the most direct route), and aptly enough, a teapot. Part of Jakes Lake is seen in the distance. Photo looks W.
So, SPHP, is it tea time? What kind of tea are we having? Did you bring any crumpets? …… Umm, heh, sorry Looper, I didn’t remember to bring any tea. Kind of short on crumpets, too, to tell the truth. Guess I wasn’t thinking.
Loopster astride the big tan rock formation, with Jakes Lake on the L. Photo looks W.

For a little while, Lupe and SPHP stayed together up on the tan rock formation enjoying the view of the lakes and forests of central British Columbia.  Before long voices were heard approaching from the E.  More hikers.  Time to go and let them enjoy this beautiful spot in peace.  Loop still had many miles to go today anyway.

Lupe saw more teapots placed on rocks and in trees along the S rim of Teapot Mountain as she completed the loop back to the trail down.  The clouds hadn’t so much as sprinkled any rain for a while.  On her way down, Lupe encountered several more groups of people who had decided to come up.  Apparently, Teapot Mountain really is quite a popular hike.

It was mid-afternoon by the time Lupe arrived back at the G6 (2:55 PM, 50°F) ready to resume the long drive S.  Teapot Mountain had been a pleasant break from being cooped up.  The whole trek had taken a little over 2 hours at a leisurely pace.

By evening, Lupe was far SE of Prince George near the small town of McBride.  Her day ended with a pleasant twilight stroll exploring a quiet park next to the Fraser River.  Up until her Summer of 2016 Dingo Vacation, Lupe had never been even this far N before in her whole life.  Tomorrow she would return to more familiar territory in Jasper and Banff National Parks in the fabulous Canadian Rockies!

Note: The L (W) turn off Highway 97 onto Talus Road is about 31 miles (50 km) N of Prince George.  Follow Talus Road 1 km to a R turn onto Caine Creek Forestry Road (poorly marked).  Follow Caine Creek Forestry Road 3.3 km.  The Teapot Mountain trailhead is at the start of the first side road to the R after crossing the bridge over Crooked River.Want more Lupe adventures?  Choose from Lupe’s 2016 Canadian Rockies, Yukon & Alaska Adventure Index, Dingo Vacations Adventure Index or Master Adventure Index.  Or subscribe free to New Lupe Adventures.

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